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Jun 08

Money and Power

If anyone wants to know why money was invented they need to look at the power that it generates. Politically it is the mainstay of governments while religiously it has grown gods and made their organisations indispensable. So where does it fit into the scheme of human behaviour and why is it at the root of the World Order? One could may assume that something other than an invented commodity would fit that role so why doesn’t it?

When humans took to a sedentary life and gave up wandering the forests and taking their food from the land, as God originally intended, they had time to think about other things. In the depositions of their living areas archaeologist have uncovered tales of their development from what might be termed primitive living to the more sophisticated trade deals and exchange of goods.

Other things crop up as well and chief among them is the religious side of life and the sacred sites where they imprinted their feelings and beliefs on items in art form. Over time the images became ever more lifelike and their meanings clearer. It was there where my research discovered the power.

It came first in the form of an exchange between humanity and the Sun-God. This unmistakable giving of life for prosperity permeates the ancient world and mysterious sites, like Stonehenge in England, or the temples of the Maya in Mexico. They stand as fortresses of power holding a code within that is only now interpretable.

My reincarnation and evidence that there is no heaven or hell is behind my ability to look at these sites from a different perspective and without the religious bias to better understand their meaning. It is a fact that the ancients were desperate to communicate with the sun and they worked out ways to do that. One way was to send a man up riding the cross as a kite to mate with the Mother God. This is shown in rock art in Nordic regions, such as Ostergotland (star of god’s land).

Dispersed light creates rings of seven colours, the same as the rainbow, and the number for ‘her’ is ‘seven’. The man is number 8 and multiplied together 7×8 is 56, the number of holes in the outer circle of Stonehenge. Both these numbers are linked to ancient beliefs that carry over into modern religious practices.

There are 7 candles on the altar of Christian churches, and 7 lights in the normal Jewish menorah, and so on. There are also 7 days of the week and 3×7 is 21, another mystical number. The 3 represents the ancient trinity of Mother God, sun and light.

Stonehenge displays the practice of exchanging god-men on crosses for fertility of the earth. The core of the site is the horse-shoe shape enclosed by the trilithons, made of 2 upright stones with a cap supporting them are the top. The ‘horse’ features prominently in ancient rituals and the white horse was etched out of the underlying chalk in several places in both Britain and Europe.

In time the use of circles as a symbol of exchange gave rise to the coins that were imprinted with the king’s head because he was supposedly the one married to the sun. The magic of handing over his image in exchange for goods took hold and gave rise to the monetary system. It was enhanced by Constantine, who established the Catholic Church in the year 325. He is also the one who organised the system of commerce that is still in play.